Tag Archives: Daisy Yellow Challenge

ICAD 2015 has left the building

ICAD 1_Final Set 073115

All 61 index cards, pinned and clipped to the incredibly purple wall next to the art table in the workroom.

Last year — the first time I did ICAD — I was acutely aware of the need to build the habit of doing a card every day through June and July.  I was glad to have Tammy’s lists of prompts and themes as anchors — ideas that I could count on to help me come up with something when my own thoughts couldn’t pin anything down.

This year was different. I knew I could do it; I realized that there was nothing in the challenge that required my daily output to mean anything to anyone but myself. The cards didn’t have to be gorgeous or skillful — they didn’t even have to be good. I used this year’s ICAD as a chance to try new things, to have a new look at old things, sometimes to simply play.

I rarely used the daily prompts; if I liked a theme I went with it for as long as it appealed to me. I played with paints and textures, colors and line. I snipped words and images from magazines and books. I made marks with pens and whatever else seemed like it could, well, make the sort of marks I wanted to make.  I sometimes worked in silence, but more often than not at least semi-aware of the TV on somewhere nearby — in fact, the last couple of weeks I’ve been consciously working interesting bits of dialogue into text.

I’ve learned a bit more about letting go, and I’ve become a little better at recognizing what’s important to me. And I know that creating — making — every day is at the very center of that.

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Imperfect circles

WarmUp_ImpCircles1_2015

Warm up #8 for Daisy Yellow ICAD 2015: very imperfect circles, drawn in Sharpie with my left hand just to sort of fill the page, then some practice blending colored pencils to fill them in and fine Sharpie pen web background.


Top Ten List

WarmUp_TopTen_askew_2015

I didn’t quite follow Daisy Yellow’s instructions for this warm up — I forgot about the “use a different writing tool for each one” part. (Perhaps I subconsciously did it on purpose — I am so attached to my Sharpie pens and so not a fan of things that require me to follow directions…) But I had fun coming up with the list, and adding the little icons for each — and couldn’t resist adding in the little bits of humor.


Tangent #3 (at last) Accordion Book

This challenge took a while between start and finish:  Daisy Yellow’s tutorial for Accordion Book Tangent was posted way back on August 18th. Over the time I worked on it, the backgrounds on each side came out quite differently and I couldn’t decide how or, ultimately, if I’d bring them together.  One side’s Bright, all about Color; the other is Dark and about Process. Both feature squares randomly cut from glossy bookmarks and postcards collected at science fiction conventions I attended this year.

DY Accordion Book Bright Side croppedDY Accordion Book Dark Side cropped


Tangents #7: Pattern Grids

This last Daisy Yellow Tangents and Tactics exercise was a bit addicting, so I ended up doing it twice in over the weekend. Once in Black & White, using my fattest chisel-tip Sharpies, plus my new favorite dip pen and white ink for the text on a single cut-from-a magazine-page shiny black square. (Note to the observant:  The over-sized initial letter of text was not intentional; the ink blobbed because I forgot to check the flow, and I decided it would become the pen-and-ink equivalent of have lemons, make lemonade.)

DY B&W Pattern Grid cropped

The color version had an added element of experimentation. Cruising the after-back-to-school clearance racks at a local Target, I came across a set of Yoobi markers, promising that they would be used to draw over each other for patterns that would not bleed. I hadn’t any idea what that could mean — I draw over things all the time with markers to make patterns without bleeding — but they were marked down to $1.48, and who can resists a whole set of chubby markers for under a buck and a half? I thought I’d try them for a color version of the pattern grid tangent — and was absolutely blown away! Five “step 1” super-bright color markers — lime green, orange, red, magenta, and purple — plus a couple of “step 2” markers that were colorless until used over the step 1 markers, changing those into another color completely.  No way to do these justice but on a solid black background.

Flashback to the Psychedelic Sixties, anyone? (Click on image for full effect; click again on details if you dare…)

DY Color Pattern Grid cropped


(Warm up for) Tangent #6: Quirky Girls

DY Girl Face practice gridFollowing Daisy Yellow’s tutorial, an index card grid of hastily-sketched girl female faces.  I can’t change the name of the exercise, but in my head, these are not only girls — there are a bunch of women up there as well. I think the one in the fifth column, middle row looks the most like me — my chubby nose and the “but I am smiling” expression on my face in most photographs.


Tangent #4: Grid

DY Grid croppedI’ve started a new art journal in an old children’s book. The heavy cardboard pages are just right for messing around with paints — they don’t bend or curl, which means I can really slap it on and work things over and over and over again if that seems to be the right thing to do.

My response to Daisy Yellow’s 4th Tangent tutorial, is this grid collage, painted over a two-page spread,  It’s probably a little neater and controlled than directed by the tutorial, but a lot less so than my typical comfort zone. I used bright blue and yellow Cray-Pas to make the smudgy edges — from an ancient box in my stash, originally a gift from my father, who passed away 30 years ago.